Shards of Varax

The Story so Far...

Of heroic first meetings and early deeds heroic and malicious

FROM THE CHRONICLES OF HAVMAAR WADDLEFRUMP, SCRIBE OF THE NORTHERN KINGDOMS

After journeying to the town of Raven’s Roost, four strangers met in the tavern called the “Maiden’s Meet.” They were, in order of descending height: Dagger, the half-elven ranger from the wilds of Wylanquost Forest; Smit Moo, the elven paladin from the southern sands; Grauk Schlect, the dwarven warrior from the icy north, and Maurice Grimblefinger, the gnomish wizard hailing from the darkened depths of Dunn Dunnkle—the ancient gnomish homeland.

The night of their first meeting, after much merrymaking, a troubled pair of young travelers sought the group’s help. It seems a friend of the troubled youths had gone missing, and in light of recent menacing and unexplained activity-sheep found mutilated and drained of blood, for instance-the heroes decided to look for the missing young man.

After an unexpected encounter with a farmer (which bears no repeating here, lest innocent parties be wrongly incriminated) the group made their way to a crumbling stone tower. Inside, they discovered that the goblins who had once lived there had been mostly exterminated by some foul, undead creatures who had taken up residence in the tower.

But wait—another hero joined at this point in our tale!

Tripetta the Magnificiplent, another gnome, made her way to the tower, pursuing her own investigation of the recent uncanny happenings around Raven’s Roost. Though their meeting was not at first entirely friendly, the attack of a terrified goblin swiftly brought Tripetta into friendship-or at least collaboration-with the group,

Out of kindness or foolishness, or some combination of the twain, the group took on this lone goblin who had evidently survived by hiding beneath rubble and feeding on rats. Should this become significant later, and for ease of reference, the goblins name was “Gorku,” though spelling of goblin names is dodgy at best.

After exploring the tower, and discovering wretched creatures composed of crudely stitched together limbs and pieces of odd machinery, the group came at last to he who had created these travesties, these mockeries of life. The group defeated the necromancer, though much bedlam and many near disasters struck in the meantime—including a covert feud over Gorku’s loyalty between the ranger, Dagger, and the cleric, Tripetta. Certain furnishing in the tower were lit aflame during the adventure as well, though the cause of the resulting fire is still a point of dispute among scholars and chroniclers such as myself. There were also allegations that the gnomish wizard, Maurice, had sabotaged the weapons of a fellow party member who was known to be a loose cannon, but again, as with the identity of the arsonist, I cannot confirm or deny this.

As the group pillaged the necromancer’s hoard, the one known as Dagger spotted the villain’s head scampering away on mechanical feet. She shot at the thing with her longbow, but missed, and it managed to escape through some sort of arcane portal. The group followed, and found themselves in the Stonehold Foothils, where they tracked the animated head into some natural caverns with the aid of a halfling refugee from a nearby village which had been besieged by Ogres and Giants.

In the dark of the cave, the group slayed an ogre, shortly after which they met two strangers—a fair-skinned man with ebon hair and silvered armor, and a corpulent woman with locks of tarnished bronze. The pair of strangers attempted to parley with the heroes, but the two groups came to conflict and the strangers retreated into the depths of the caverns, their escape aided by a group of ogres led by a hill giant. The man in the silver helm is said to have insulted the paladin’s honor as he made his escape, a detail worth mentioning in this entry because, well, we all know how paladin’s can get about honor.

-END OF ENTRY--

More details shall appear in this volume as pages of Waddlefrump’s journal become available for transcription.

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